Our Skoolie is Complete

Today we announce our completed skoolie! It’s done. We hope you enjoy the video.

Final Silicon Touches in the Bathroom

V didn’t think I did a good enough job on the bathroom so she dove back in there to put even more detailed thought into little room of water. She sanded the grout and the ceiling down to a smooth finish, then used the stain to reseal the room. Finally, she went to war with a particularly sticky brand of silicone. It was a battle, but at the end of it, she was able to accurately explain, “the bathroom is done.”

V was happy to use silicone on the final day

Final Skoolie Electrical Upgrades

I upgraded some dangerous wiring I had set up. A few months ago I installed Romex 14/4 on a 20 amp circuit. Thanks to the YouTube community watching our build videos, I was alerted to the fact that my 20 amp circuit breaker is not of suitable restriction to limit the power to NOT burn up the 14/4 Romex, should an overvoltage event occur.

Now the 20 amp tandem breakers have been switched over for 15 amp single breakers. We now have a safe electrical system on the bus.

Final Skoolie Electronic Works

Next, I added a water heater switch to the internal house bus brain. The water heater switch is there for extended departures on the bus. Now we flip a simple switch to conserve gas. Huzzah!

Skoolie Spice Cabinet

We created the spice rack from Christmas tins. V painted the tin and I screwed them into our cabinet walls.

Final Skoolie Touches - Painting the Spice Rack

Easy Peasy.

Final Skoolie Touches - The spice rack cabinet

Look at those Happy Faces

We started this conversion in March of 2017 and it’s now December of 2017 as we declare the project as completed.

The smiles on our faces are testament to the relief we feel knowing this project is complete.

Ian and V are happy to take time away from the skoolie

Though it took us three times longer than we anticipated, we are happy that we can call the school bus conversion project, done.

It will soon be for rent on Airbnb. I will link the listing below once it is live.

Thank you for reading. Please let me know if you have any questions in the comment section below.

V Waves ‘Goodbye for Now’ to the Skoolie

Waving Goodbye to the Completed Skoolie

Wrapping the Skoolie Bathroom

In today’s video, I wrap up sealing the skoolie bathroom and I install the towel rack and the toilet paper dispenser thing. It’s a fairly swift video, but I hope it serves you well.

Urethane Application Supplies

Urethane | Brush | Sandpaper | Respirator

Spar Urethane Application Notes

Many tutorials online attempt to make this process seem much more challenging than it really is. I found the process to be very simple.

First I used a large sponge and wrapped the sponge with 220-grit sandpaper. This allowed me to sand the strange angles.

The first application sucked up a LOT of the urethane. The fresh wood inhaled the product so the first layer involved using half of the can’s contents. The second one probably used 1/16 of the can.

Many people talk about avoiding bubbles and doing a very careful job with this. I found that information to be stunting. At the end of the day, watching videos where people used a ton of caution just held me back. The material goes on clear and I didn’t have any bubbles. At first, I worked hard to be very delicate with the material, by the end, I was slapping it on and spreading it out. Both methods of application resulted in similar results.

Testing the Seal

To test the urethane, I splashed water on the wood. If it had soaked into the wood, I would have known that another coat or two would be needed. Luckily, after two coats, the water beaded up and dripped from the ceiling. After I dried the water off, there was no visual sign that the water had penetrated the urethane coat.

School Bus AirBnB – Final Upholstery Project and Driving the Bus to SoCal

When we started this school bus Airbnb back in March, we had no idea what was in store for V and me.

The Bus at Red Rock Canyon

We thought we would be able to wrap up the conversion in about three months. Back in that spring of 2017, we expected to finish the project in time to go on a tour of the country, attending the Burningman art festival in August, spending a few weeks on the road and finally bringing the bus to Huntington Beach where we would rent it out as an AirBnB while we left the country to visit Australia for a wedding and some surf.

If you’ve been following along on this journey via our YouTube channel, you’ll know our plans were laughably optimistic. Burningman came and went while we worked on the bus, then the weeks between the art festival and the Australia trip passed. V actually left me with the bus while she flew out in time to make her sister’s wedding. I was left alone to finish the bus.

So I pushed on for another month or two. Finally, all the systems were in and the bus was ready to go. Again, I had problems with mechanical stuff. The fuel pump needed to be replaced and the bus needed to be registered legally. I wrapped those two projects up in Reno while I watched my parent’s house while they were out of the country.

That’s where this video comes into play.

The first eggs cooked on the bus

What Now

Now the bus will become an AirBnB property in Southern California. That’s the goal.

You see, when I started, I wanted to drive the bus around to national parks and work online from the comfort of a dusty road. Now, I just want to leave the bus behind and start recouping a bit of the investment.

While driving from Reno to LA, I realized the bus has a new oil leak and the power steering leak became progressively worse. It seems that the more time I spend with the bus, the worse the problems get.

Therefore, it makes sense to allow the house to start taking care of its self.

The next few videos will be about getting the bus ready for a vacation rental. Once that is complete, I plan on having a point where we have no plans.

I’ve planned my life out for the last 5 years. It’s time to create an opportunity where I can wake up one morning and think, “Today we are free to do and go wherever it is that we want to.”

Recent Thank You

Mom and Dad -Mom your emotional support has fortified me through some very challenging times. Dad, if you didn’t teach me to build stuff, this project would have been 100% impossible.

Lauren – You’re a best friend sis’. Also, you’re able to sew like a pro, despite being an am. 😀

David Vu – Your excitement to take on business challenges and work with V and I is a life saver.

Scott Siller – Thank you for reaching out via the YouTube comments and supporting me in the Nevada Vehicle Registration process. I was afraid of the process until your calm explanation made it feel like a simple hurdle to jump over.

The Kinsinger Family – Thank you for keeping me at your Thanksgiving dinner. It was an absolute delight.

Registering a Skoolie in Nevada

Registering a skoolie in Nevada is not as challenging as I initially anticipated. It’s just like registering a salvaged car. Check out the video to get an idea of the story. I’ll add additional information related to costs and document types on the blog below.

How I Registered My Skoolie in Nevada

More to come shortly.

Soft-Close Ball Bearing Drawer Slide Installation and Building 3/4″ Plywood Drawers

This video is a more complete documentation of building the custom drawers and Installing soft-close ball bearing drawer slides.

If you’re finding this because you plan to do the project yourself, I suggest checking out my previous video on soft-close ball bearing drawers as well.

Additional Drawer Installation Video – Click Here

Custom Drawers

Notes on Installing Soft-Close Ball Bearing Drawer

The devil with installing ball-bearing sliding drawer rails is in the details. The reality is that I spent a lot more time contemplating and measuring. These videos appear as if it was a quick, easy process to plan what to do next.

Drawer Slides

Because the drawers are square and the hardware is straight, it is critical to measure carefully. I was off by 1/4″ in terms of square-trapezoid shape. That difference in sliding rail measurement differences was enough for the hardware to function improperly.

Installing Soft-Close Ball Bearing Drawer

Questions?

If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to ask below. If you ask pertinent, important questions relating to the topic of installing drawer slides, I can respond below with my thoughts. Those comments are public to everyone else reading this post. With luck, we can build a great resource here for future people.

Ideally, I’d like to have a great resource for others while learning the ways that others can improve the installation process.

Skoolie Pocket Door

In this episode of the bus conversion story, I install the skoolie pocket door.

Pocket Door Installation Tips

I believe my adhesion of the poly wall to the door was insufficient. This is only something I wanted to do because the door is there to keep water from going into the hallway.

The second thing I wish I had done was that I wish I had installed the handle before I put the door up. Here’s an example of the handle hardware:

Pocket Door Handle Hardware: http://amzn.to/2z5A797

One thing that I struggled with was getting the door in place. I learned, through trial and error, that the best way to get the door to hang was it get it in place and then pry the door up using a corner. I then used the back side of my utility knife (this one specifically) to push the slider onto it’s mount. Once that first slider was connected to the door, I pried the door the opposite way so that the other mount met the sliding hardware. I hope that helps.

If you have anything to add, or you have any questions regarding skoolie pocket door installation, please let me know in the comments below.

Pocket Door Materials and Tools

If you’re hoping to do this, here is a link to the hardware I used to build the door:

Pocket Door Slider Hardware: http://amzn.to/2z47KIl

I used the 60″ version of the hardware, but I believe I cut the hardware down a little bit. My door turned out to be about 26 inches wide and the door way is 24 inches wide. Therefore, two inches worth of door stays hidden behind the wall at all times.