Udemy Promotional Pricing | Testing Opting Out – Bad Idea

I really like Udemy.

They have an excellent platform and it’s getting better all the time. If you are making your first online course, Udemy is the best.

When creating an online course, there are a dump truck of little things to get stuck on. Udemy is building a platform to manage those little things for instructors like myself. New instructors get to focus on building their course and serving their students, rather than understanding the JavaScript library and other platform problems like that.

Software, hosting, credit card processing, internet traffic and a million other little things are no longer on the teacher’s ‘to-do’ list. Udemy is a great partner and if you have the opportunity to work with them, take it. It’s a great offer.

Alas, our podcast production business is growing into a larger organization. It’s important that our teaching reflects that growth too.

For that reason, I’m exploring removing our podcast production course from Udemy’s Promotional Pricing for a short time. I’ll test the results and share those results here.

TLDR? Important Stuff First

Professional Podcast Production Stats:

  • Course published April 2015
  • Course has been on Udemy for 21 months
  • $6,009 is Freedom Podcasting’s profit for that period
  • $273.15 is the average profit per month over that 21 month period
  • We’ve agreed to the Udemy Deals Program for this entire period
  • We opted out of the Udemy Deals Program on January 8th, 2017

What is Udemy Promotional Pricing?

Udemy Promotional Pricing

There are two parts of the Udemy Promotional Pricing:

  1. Percentage Promotions – Udemy’s sales team offers the teachers course at a discount of up to 75% depending on the time of year and the promotion
  2. Fixed-Price Promotions – Udemy’s sales team offers the teachers course at a specified price. This is the clause that, as far as I understand it, makes it so that many instructors often see their courses listed at $10.

Why We’re Testing Opting Out

Price is a signal of quality – I’m confident that the course is worth more and it’s important that incoming students know that they are signing up for something that is really going to teach them. A low price signals that the course doesn’t need to be taken quite as seriously.

What Podcast Production Looks Like Discounted
It is possible that dramatic discounts like this hurt the perceived value of this course.

We’re really confident with the course. We have more than twenty students who have gone through the course and created their own podcasts which live on the iTunes store.

Status Updates

Jan 8th, 2017

Even though I removed the podcast production course from Udemy Promotional Pricing, that doesn’t mean the course will be removed from current promotions. We’re currently in a promotion phase that will conclude on January 11th, 2017.

For now, we wait.

Jan 12th, 2017

All the promotions have run out and I no longer see my podcast production course for sale under the listed price. So it’s clear that the instructor can opt-in and opt-out of the Udemy Deals Program.

I’m planning on running this test for at least a month to see the results.

Feb 14th, 2017

 

Well. I think this test is complete.

It turns out opting out of the Udemy Deals program is a good way to make your revenue go down. During the month of February I only received 1 sale for the Podcast Production Course. Today, that student asked for a refund.

Generally, the course would of made between $100 and $300 by this time of the month. But right now, it’s at zero.

Bottom line, I’m going to turn it back on and see what happens. I hope I haven’t angered the Udemy gods and killed my long term sales.

Feb 17th, 2017

Well, thats pretty conclusive. After turning Udemy Deals Program back on, I’ve already received 3 new students. I didn’t change a single thing in my marketing behavior and my website analytics didn’t boom elsewhere. Udemy just started promoting my course again.

So that’s it. Maybe I’ll update this post in the future, but for now, I have a conclusion.

Udemy Deals Program is a valuable offering that Udemy makes to their instructors.

Thoughts?

If you have any experience with this, I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments section below.

Finding Remote Work as a Computer Programmer

Both of these companies are on my radar because I like the founder’s stories and the stuff they make. I’ve never actually found a job using these guys, but if I were looking for a job, these would be the first two places I would go to.

Toptal

Toptal seems to make a point of being the best place to find really good programmers. The only scary thing about Toptal would be overcoming the fear of rejection that they might not let you into their marketplace. They vet everyone who comes to their marketplace because they want to ensure they only market programmers who are really good.

They seem to be an agency + marketplace. I think a programmer could land cool gigs with their help.

Being a freelancer can suck. Freelancers do their own government compliance, they act as their own marketing department and there is a crazy cycle of looking for projects, executing projects, billing for projects and looking for more projects. This is a lot of stuff to deal with on your own. It’s hard work.

I believe Toptal helps with this sort of stuff. They vet everyone so they will have a good idea for what you need. They have existing relationships with companies so they market for you. I believe the companies pay Toptal and they pay you which makes your billing/tax challenges much less complex.

If you just want to focus on writing beautiful code, Toptal might be great.

Learn a bit more about Breanden Beneschott via his writing for the Huffington Post here.

RemoteOK.io

There are always interesting looking programming jobs on this site. The companies pay to make their listings so the positions are listed by motivated companies looking to hire remote workers.

Here it appears that one is more likely to find a job here, as opposed to a freelancer type commitment.

Another cool thing about RemoteOK.io is that Peter Levels is the guy behind the site. He does a lot of interesting work in the remote money making sphere.

2016 – A Year in Review

What Happened

January

We started the year in a city called the Gold Coast, Australia. If you want a tour, you can have one for free here.

We took a trip up to Far North Queensland to horse ride, scuba dive, SUP and eat ice cream with some of our favorite people the Rumneys. They also make ice cream and it’s really really delicious.

We went to a billabong near Brisbane with some international friends. There we found a rope swing that we monkeyed around on.

Then we flew to Chiang Mai, Thailand. That’s a great way to start any year, right?

From Queen Sirikit Botanical Gardens outside Chiang Mai

February

In Chiang Mai we met a lot of new friends. Ben showed us a secret local waterfall spot.

Justin showed us around the Night Bazaar.

We went to the Nomad Summit. Big thanks to Johnny for inviting us and organizing the event. Also for inspiring this post. Here’s his year-end wrap up post.

We drove some big motorcycles to the highest point in Thailand.

Then we took the sleeper train to Bangkok. It was fun. We made a movie about it.

Bangkok was a lot of fun. Johnny Ward showed us around his favorite spots and to a roof top bar. Thanks JW.

Then we took another train and bus to Krabi. There we rented a motorcycle from Moto Krabi and drove it to Ko Lanta where we found a place to live for a month.

March

In Ko Lanta we did a lot of CrossFit with Robert at Fit On Lanta.

We toured the Tiger Cave with Norwegian Ninjas.

We went SCUBA diving with Johnny at Hin Daeng.

Drove around the island and went to more caves with Daniella.

Drank a lot of coffee while working at KoHub.

Rented dirt bikes and drove all around the island with David, Johnny and Max.

Then we learned how to cook Thai food.

We met Chris and Sam for the first time. We became fast friends and knew we’d see them again soon.

We drove our motorcycle back to Krabi, then we went up the Coast for a 5 day Live-aboard Scuba Diving trip in the Similian Island National Park. We made a movie about that experience too.

Then we took a long tail boat to Tonsai and spent a few days there with crazy looking monkeys, paddling around the islands and jumping off cliffs.

I don’t remember how we got to China, but we did it for a visa run. You’ve got to leave Thailand every once in a while if you want to live there for more than 1-2 months.

Macau was really crazy. It’s the Las Vegas of China.

April

We flew back to Chiang Mai to kick it with Sam and Chris during the Songkran Festival. We spray painted our big guns gold

We drove a scooter from Chiang Mai to Chiang Rai along the way visiting the Sticky Waterfalls. We got stuck in the biggest rainstorm of the year. We made it, but it was uncomfortable.

We toured around Chiang Rai with V’s father for 2 days and then drove the scooter back to Chiang Mai. Wow. That was a huge drive on a scooter.

We spent the rest of the month working and getting strong at Chiang Mai CrossFit. After 3 months in Thailand we flew to San Francisco, California.

May

Our good friends Kimi and Declan had an amazing wedding in wine country, Napa Valley. Seriously, they have a cool group of family and friends and it was a magical celebration.

We then enjoyed horseriding and croquet with family and friends in Reno, Nevada. Also wakeboarding at Pyramid Lake.

I don’t know how everything worked out exactly, but next we flew to St. Maarten in the Caribbean, because my friend Dane was marrying Miriam. It was great to see old friends and explore the beauty of the island.

June

The Nomad Cruise picked us up from the capital and southern part of the island, Phillipsburg. We spent the next 10 days cruising from St. Maarten to Lisbon, Portugal. On that ship we met a LOT of really, really cool people.

David, Lily, V and I had a really massive power tour around Lisbon. Miles and Melanie joined us for some of it too. That was an epic day. I haven’t even made that movie yet.

We took a massive journey from Lisbon, Portugal back to Reno, Nevada because we thought we were needed at a party that had been cancelled unbeknownst to us. That was hilarious. V didn’t think so.

Next we moved to the Bay Area to house and dog sit. I met Seth Godin in San Francisco during Udemy Live. We explored the city and flew David’s drone alot. That was really neat.


July

We spent quality time with family after my grandfather passed away.

Then we moved to San Francisco and our good friends Jel and Sam visited us from Australia. I also studied really really hard to get into App Academy in San Francisco. Software Engineering is not easy.

August

I was accepted into Hack Reactor and App Academy in San Francisco. All that work studying software engineering paid off. It was a tough choice, but I went with App Academy. Getting accepted into that program was a really proud moment.

The program wouldn’t start till November so we took a road trip down South to Los Angeles and Huntington Beach after David invited us to the Magic Castle. We had a really great time. David took V on a private plane and I went surfing with John. We did a lot of cool stuff. Thanks for being the host with the most David. You Rock!

September

After we got back from So Cal V’s twin sister Vanessa and her husband Mark came to visit us in Reno. We celebrated the twins birthday and had a really fun week.

V went riding with her sister, I went riding with my sister.

We wakeboarded at Pyramid lake and did high speed aquatic push up competitions.

Then we went rock climbing with friends, Roxy, Jake, Brian, John, Vanessa and Mark.

We decided to take another road trip to Las Vegas, The Grand Canyon and Sedona to see Miles and Melanie. We met them on the Nomad Cruise, so the next logical thing to do would be hang out in the desert in Arizona right?…. right….

October

I got back into video editing in October and finally caught up on making the movies for the year.

On the way back from Sedona we stopped at Zion National Park, Utah before chilling out at the hot springs in Austin, NV. That was a fun drive.

We began V’s citizenship process.

Then we lost a friend. 🙁

November

Things got weird in November, but I wrote about what I’m grateful for that election cycle. But a lot of cool stuff happened too. We spent alot of time with family and friends. We also went on a boat ride around the Foster City canals with the family for Thanksgiving.

December

Despite studying as hard as I could, I failed out of App Academy. That was a big bummer, but life goes on.

V and I got caught in a snow storm but managed to make it back to Reno just in time for the holiday festivities. That was the first Christmas we had with my family in a really long time. Three years to be exact.  We spent Christmas Day skiing with the family. It was a blast.

We’re back in San Francisco Bay Area for the time being.

That’s how the year went. Wow.

Happy New Year everyone!

How Fake News Works

Fake news is something I want everyone around me to know about. I’m in the media industry so I know this stuff to be true because we are part of the attention economy. Here are some quick, entertaining pieces of media which describe what’s going on.

I don’t believe in massive conspiracies. To me, the market economy for attention is the primary cause of the Fake News.

For example, I know it’s easy to make a website that earns consistent monthly cashflow from web traffic via Google Adsense. So in order to make a good amount of money on the side, one only needs to generate web-traffic. To get web-traffic, one powerful option is to write controversial things with no real basis in reality.

That’s why the media today works the way it does. It’s not a shadowy thing, it’s clear and obvious. Here’s how it works:

How Fake News Works

Trust Me I’m Lying came out years ago, but Ryan’s thesis has only been supported by reality in the last few years.

If you’re unfamiliar with Ryan Holiday, he is a young, astute marketer who grew up in the modern media. His list of successful clients speaks for it’s self. From my experience, the media landscape that Ryan talks about is exactly how I see it.

Fake News is Difficult to Differentiate

Whenever we read anything on the internet, we must be conscious of the nature of why that media is there. NPR did a great job telling the story of The Fake News King:

Do you have any resources to share regarding the digital media in 2017?

Please feel free to share links and thoughts in the comment section below.

 

Election 2016

Election 2016 – Things I’m grateful for:

Here’s a TLDR list. The longer version can be found below.

  • Peaceful, professional transition of power
  • The voting process was easy and the ballots were balanced
  • Excellent open data provided quickly by a portfolio of media sources:

Fox News | CNN | Google | New York Times

  • Referendum to decriminalize Marijuana in my home state passed! Less people in prison, less government involvement in an individuals choices (which don’t effect others) and the state government is likely to see a tax revenue injection that will surprise us all
  • Lessons Learned

Peaceful, Professional Transition of Power

non-peaceful transition of power
While living in Chile, I witnessed violent elections. It’s not preferable.

I’ve been in foreign countries and seen ugly elections. One time specifically, I was advised to stay home and not leave the house for the day. It was a violent day where people were hurt, bombs were thrown and arrests were made.

President Obama invited President-elect Trump to the White House. They will work together on details and soon enough, President Obama will have his life back. He can continue to lead afterwards in harmony with the new national leadership.

I would have preferred to see Hillary Clinton win. At the same time, I recognize that the majority of US citizens feel passionately that what she represents, is not the best for the country. That’s how we play the game. The representational democracy picked him and I believe in that process more than anything else.

 

‘Many forms of Government have been tried, and will be tried in this world of sin and woe. No one pretends that democracy is perfect or all-wise. Indeed it has been said that democracy is the worst form of Government except for all those other forms that have been tried from time to time.…’

– Winston S Churchill, 11 November 1947

 

Easy Voting Process with Quality Ballots

Voting was easy. Registering took a few minutes online. At the University of Nevada, there wasn’t even a line to stand in when I voted early.

nevada voter experience

The Nevada Sample Ballot

The sample ballot that arrived was a quick 15 minute read and told the story of the addendum opportunities and the candidates. It did so from both perspectives and had research based arguments. If it was longer, it would have been burdensome to read. If it were shorter, I feel it would have been to incomplete to give a full picture of the questions.

Excellent Open Data and Election Coverage

I watched the election on Fox News, CNN, Google, Twitter and more. Though some were better than others, they all told a very similar story.

Hat tip to CNN. They had the best design and technology on their side.

The New York Times was the first to give Mr. Trump a 95% + likelihood of winning from what I saw.

Overall, there was a lot of excellence happening all over the media. We in the United States enjoy excellent election coverage.

Decriminalizing Marijuana in Nevada

So proud of the referendum outcome for question #2 in Nevada. I prefer beer, but knowing that the pot smokers will soon be free of the fear of imprisonment is PHENOMENAL!

What happened to Colorado may happen to Nevada! What does this mean for the state?

Image #1

Colorado Road Mortality since Marijuana legalization
Data pulled on Road Mortalities in Colorado. I separated it via the red line from when Marijuana was decriminalized in 2012.
Source: https://www.codot.gov/library/traffic/safety-crash-data/fatal-crash-data-city-county/fatalities-by-person-type/view

 

Image #2

incarceration rates and the effect of Marijuana decriminalization
So crime dropped steadily, while incarceration rates PLUMMETED. All this while population grew! 😀
Source: https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/dcj-ors/ors-crimestats

 

marijuana penalties that will go away

Lessons Learned

I didn’t think Trump had any chance of winning and I didn’t want him to. This goes to show that I didn’t have any idea what was going on. My perception last night was that we were sitting down to watch her take the election, but I got it 100% wrong.

Some very smart people had it right.

This election taught me that I need to listen better and try to find the lower level clues as to what is actually going on in the world.

Your thoughts?

I’d love to hear what you’re grateful for this election. Please let me know in the comment section below.

TransferWise Review – International Money Transfer Case Study from USD to AUD

TransferWise Review - From USD to AUD

Get your First Transfer Free

The banks are out to get us. I’m seeking ways to fight back. International money transfers are one of the banks little secrets. TransferWise says they can save us. So I tried them. Here is a TransferWise review.

TransferWise Review
Click This Image for a Free Transfer

Planet Money did a great piece on the invisible financial pipes that move money. This was part of their “t-shirt project.” In it, they talk about the Automated Clearing House (ACH) and what it took to move money from their Kickstarter (e.g. Amazon) to their Chase Bank account. Note: Listen to that podcast. It’s excellent.

In Australia, the banks just offer free money transfers. That’s right. It’s free in Australia with bank apps on your phone. Apps like Cash and Venmo are making it easier in America. Transferwise is the only place doing it internationally right now that I know of.

We’re moving money to Australia this month. We’re going to be testing TransferWise.com to see if we can save ourselves some fees.

TLDR – It’s great. Click here to transfer your first bit of $ for free.

A Transferwise Review

A long time ago in a….

TransferWise came across my desk a long time ago in a paid advertisement on Facebook. I clicked through, but didn’t need to move money at the time. After bookmarking the page, I was excited for the opportunity when I would need to move a good amount of money internationally.

November 20th, 2015

Today was that day I found a need to move money from the USA to Australia.

The Transferwise steps were easy to follow. They have a pretty good UI on the surface, but it wasn’t perfect…

I noticed some strange glitches in their software. At one point, it seemed as if I saw someone else’s screen before it flashed back to my screen. Very strange and disconcerting when you’re moving large amounts of money. This happened a few times. It’s a glitchy user experience.

My International Money Transfer Situation

By the way, I’m moving about $4,300 USD from a CapitalOne account to a Commonwealth Bank account. To clarify, thats a United States savings account to an Australian checking account.

I was able to generate a code on the CapitalOne online banking login and use that code to authorize the transfer with the TransferWise.

To my dismay, I learned that the transfer will take 1-5 business days from CapitalOne to TransferWise. Also, my Australian bank will also require 2-3 business days for the money to clear in that account. So 3-8 days in total to move some digits across a line.

Ahhh the wonders of the modern financial system.

Anyways, I clicked transfer and the deal is in action.

As I go back to the site to check the status of the transfer, they have this cryptic page that doesn’t tell me information about fees. I’m unsure of the fee schedule. I can ascertain the conversion rate because they tell me the amount I’m transferring in USD and what we will receive in AUD:

  • $4,300 USD/$5,923 AUD = Which equals a rate of .725 AUD/USD
  • .72 AUD/USD is the mid-market rate as reported by Google

Testing Transferwise vs Midmarket Rate

So it looks great.

I’m in it now. I’ll wait 1-5 business days for CapitalOne to release the money to TransferWise. Then I’ll wait for however long it takes for the money to move through TransferWise to CommonWealth bank. Finally, I’ll wait 2-3 business days for CommonWealth to clear the funds on their end.

November 24th, 2015

Four days have passed.

The transfer has come through. It all cleared. Here is a screen shot of what I’m seeing via the dashboard of the Transferwise website:

Transferwise Screenshot for Case Study
I’ve blacked out my wife’s name. Nothing more.

Transferwise (as per the screenshot above) tells me that the transfer was completed for $5,923.79 AUD.

Commonwealth Bank Transaction Details

 

The amount shown in Commonwealth bank is $5,923.79 AUD.

The deal went through. They transferred what they said they would! Huzzah!

Deconstructing the International Money Transfer via TransferWise

This is the actual rate we experienced transferring from CapitalOne in the United States to the Commonwealth Bank in Australia:

$4,300 USD / $5,923.79 AUD = $.72588 USD/AUD

The mid-market exchange rate from Yahoo Finance saw a low of $0.7187 AUD/USD and a high of $0.7216 AUD/USD the day of the transfer. Here is a screenshot:

Transferwise review Mid-market rate vs actual transfer rate

So depending on the time of transfer, that $4,300 USD would have exchanged at a low of $5,983.03 AUD to a high of $5,958.98 AUD.

Here is a table describing the actual mid-market rate vs. realized exchange rate from the transfer:

The Day’s Price Point Mid-market rate at $4.3k USD Realized from Transfer Amount Unaccounted for in Transfer
When Market was Low  $5,983.03 AUD $6,023.25 AUD  $40.22 AUD
When Market was High  $5,958.98 AUD $6,023.25 AUD  $63.27 AUD

So the real cost of the money transfer was between $40-64 AUD (or $28-46 USD).

Free. Nope. Better than the banks? Good question.

November 24th, 2015 (Later that Night)

I received a receipt clearing some stuff up. This was my mistake. I get way too much Email and this was buried in the fray.

Here is a screenshot of it:

TransferWise Review - Final Receipt
I’ve blacked out my wife’s Email. Nothing more.

Conclusion

My guess is that the banks would offer a less attractive rate and also tag on a boatload of fees.

Transferwise did work. The ordering process was easier than going into the bank and talking to a teller. I will use it again next time I transfer money internationally.

Finally, they gave me a coupon code. If you want to use it, you could wire your first 3,000 GBP (roughly $4,500 USD) for free. If I had this code when I made the transfer, I would have actually realized the mid-market rate.

Here is the coupon code. Sure, this is an affiliate deal. You get your first transfer free if you use this link. Also, I get some money… I think. Or maybe just some free transfers. Either way, if you use this link, we both win. I did not write this article just to send you to TransferWise. I would have written ill of them if they sucked. Then I wouldn’t have put any links to send people to their service.

I wrote this article because I think international business needs to be cheaper, faster and more modern. Have a great time traveling dingo lover.

Updated November 20th, 2015 – Gold Coast, Australia

Berkshire Hathaway Letters Challenge (BHLC) – MBA Hack – 10 Years of Annual Letters

WarrenBuffettBucketNotThimble

Tim Ferriss and Pat Flynn had a great talk about the podcasting industry on Pat’s podcast.  Inspiration:

“If you do a handful of things right, even if your slow and plodding and letharic about it; you will beat almost everyone. It’s amazing…

For those who can get into dense stuff, pick up the annual letters of Warren Buffett to Berkshire Hathaway share holders. That is going to be worth more to you than any MBA program on the planet… I think.” – Tim Ferriss on Smart Passive Income podcast


Skip to 50:56 to hear Tim’s quote

Go to the Source of the Berkshire Hathaway Letters Here

Progress:

  1. 1993 Letter – BHLC: 1993 Notes and Review
  2. 1994 Letter- BHLC: 1994 Notes and Review
  3. 2006 Letter- BHLC: 2006 Notes and Review
  4. 2007 Letter- BHLC: 2007 Notes and Review
  5. 2008 Letter- BHLC: 2008 Notes and Review
  6. 2009 Letter- BHLC: 2009 Notes and Review
  7. 2010 Letter- BHLC: 2010 Notes and Review
  8. 2011 Letter- BHLC: 2011 Notes and Review
  9. 2012 Letter- Coming Soon…
  10. 2013 Letter- Coming Soon…
  11. 2014 Letter- Coming Soon…
  12. 2015 Letter- Coming Soon…

A System For Effective Time Management

As business grows, I’m implementing a system for effective time management that will allow me to leverage my time and create more abundance for my team and clients.

Here are some effectiveness tips that I’ve used to get more done.

1. Move it Once

When I worked in construction, we used to have a rule that we would move material only once.

When the siding was delivered, we either had the delivery guys take it straight to the location where it was needed, or we moved it there right away. If you ever catch yourself moving building material 2-3 times because it’s in the way, or you need the space to do another part of the project, you’re killing your productivity.

It’s much easier in a physical world to set the rule that you only move things once. A bag of concrete is a pain to handle over and over again. This same physical constraint doesn’t hold the same sway for eMails or CRM tools. It’s much easier to pass duties and materials around with eMails and CRM. In all reality, it’s just as ineffective, but we don’t feel it the same as we used to when we had to move rocks.

The lesson here is to move things as little as possible until they are in their final position.

2. List the 6 Accomplishments of the Day 

In order to avoid being reactive all day, I’m making a list of 6 tasks that will move the mission along. Big steps. Make them daring.

For Example, as a podcast production company, my list will often look like this:

  1. Produce the Latest Episode of a Show
  2. Structure the New Deal
  3. Respond to Leads from spreadsheet and e-mail optin
  4. Write a Blog for Content Marketing Purposes
  5. Follow up with X Client on Payment
  6. Develop system for new employee

3. Plan The Time You Will Spend

Now I’ll go through and allocate time to each task

  1. Structure the New Deal: Call, Send Contract and Invoice ( 1 hrs) 
  2. Respond to Leads from spreadsheet and e-mail optins ( .5 hrs)
  3. Write a Blog for Content Marketing Purposes (.5 hrs)
  4. Follow up with X Client on Payment (.25 hrs)
  5. Develop system for new employee (1.75 hrs)

Notice, my cumulative working hours are 6 or less. That’s realistic because anything more is expecting that there will be no interruptions during the day. Committing to less is a great way to ensure that I accomplish the objectives I committed to.

I make the list somewhere between 3-7 items. I try not to go crazy as a list that I can’t complete will weigh on my subconscious all day. I’ll end up feeling like a failure.

4. Plan the Day

Schedule:

  • 6:00-6:45 Surf, Eat Breakfast and make coffee
  • 7:00-7:30 Call with Client in the USA
  • 7:30-8:30 Respond to Leads from spreadsheet and e-mail optins
  • 8:30-11:00 CrossFit Workout
  • 1:00-12:00 Structure the New Deal: Call, Send Contract and Invoice
  • 12:00-12:15 Follow up with X Client on Payment
  • 1:30-2:00 Lunch
  • 2:00-3:45 Develop system for new employee
  • 3:00-5:00 Be Available for Productive Reaction to the Daily Grind
  • 5:00-5:30 Write a Blog for Content Marketing Purposes

5. Prioritize

I try to focus on difficult stuff that I’m afraid of. That is the hard work. That’s the important work.

6. Throw Away Tasks That Don’t Matter

Get rid of the tasks that don’t matter. It might seem hard at first to let things go, but do not feel bad about it. When you get to a point where you can skip tasks, it’s important to learn to do that.

Thank you for reading.

Hat Tip to The Ultimate Sales Machine for the system.

Effective E-Mail Communication

Let’s be hyper productive and make the world a better place.

I receive hundreds of emails per day and am working diligently to respond as much as possible. This is a reactive process that I deeply appreciate. It is also important that I spend most of my time in a proactive state.

To maximize our mutual proactive states, let’s follow these best e-mail practices.

With Color Added

Notes for Effective eMail Communication:

  • Make the Subject Line Descriptive – Make the purpose easy to identify

When replying with a shift in direction, change the subject line to reflect new direction.

  • Number Points – Make action items clear.

Numbered points help to make action steps identifiable and easier to execute.

  • Reflect – Read it over to ensure clear, succinct idea transmission.

Long lingering eMails are much more challenging to respond to effectively.

  • Be Solution Oriented – Asking questions is great,  but provide solutions when possible.

Solutions are what we’re all after. If you can provide direction, it will be easier to reply effectively.

With Appreciation,

Ian Robinson

Special Thanks:

Tip of the hat to Chris Ducker’s Rule of 3, Niall Doherty and The Ultimate Sales Machine by Chet Holmes for inspiring this post.
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